Elaine d'Esterre

Feminist Visual Artist – Paintings, Mixed Media and Etchings


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Mungo continued

These two images began with collagraph prints. The barely visible print in the first is concealed beneath two collaged rectangles consisting of silver leaf on red and black backgrounds. Shreds of print on semi transparent handmade paper then overlay parts of the leaf and allow part of the image beneath to ghost through.

I used a similar method with the second plate. The red collagraph print covers printed metal leaf placed on the first print that just shows through, visible in the lower section of the composition in the centre of which is a rectangular element of the imagery consisting of a silver leaf rectangle placed on a red surface.

I was trying to capture an idea of weathering process that shape the dunes and am ambivalent about the first image that may look better as a horizontal image. It began in horizontal format so… looks a bit too regular and structured maybe?

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Mungo continued

I used the same zinc plate with a collagraph glued to its surface to begin a variable edition by arranging the plate, chine colle and metal leaf into different compositions where I explored different aspect of Lake Mungo.

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Mungo

Mungo, 2015, collagraph and chine colle

Mungo, 2015, collagraph and chine colle on BFK Rives, 28×14 cm

Another version of landscape elements at Lake Mungo in printmaking media that consists of a roll up, chine colle and collagraph.

I returned to collagraph but thought I’d try it on metal plates instead of the more malleable wood or cardboard. However metal leaf as a part chine colle was not compatible as both attracted each other except in this case where the metal leaf had already been placed onto paper.

The process started unexpectedly when I had been working on a viscosity method of printing and had a ghost print left on my roller that looked more interesting than the viscosity print so I rolled it onto a sheet of BFK Rives 300 gsm and let it dry.

I noticed a square sample of gold leaf on red paper that I’d put away for later that matched the ghost roll.  So the bright yellow of the roll left over from a viscosity print had picked up a red layer from the viscosity print and melded into the yellow layer.

I made a collagraph with scrunched tissue paper and carborundum in the shape of a dune glued and sealed onto a metal plate.

I inked the plate with blue black and raw umber with plenty of extender (maybe more would have lightened it a little). The plan  for the darker layer was to tone down the layers beneath and tie together the gold leaf on the chine colle and the rather cool almost acid background yellow.

I love the art of the East and its textural nuance with which this prints seems to have an unexpected affinity but I’m not sure whether it quite captures the moonscape of Mungo. It does something else I think perhaps pointing me in another direction?


Collagraph proof: printmaking by Jill Giles

I would like to introduce Jill Giles and one of her artworks. We are fellow printmaker at the Anglesea Art House and when she experimented with plaster of paris on perspex to form a collagraph, that is the combination of relief and intaglio on a single surface, we all took notice.

Collagraph perspex plate with plaster of Paris and metal paint

An aerial view of Lake Eyre

An aerial view of Lake Eyre, first proof

The first image is one of the plate from which the print is taken and the second is the first proof that is a guide to how the image can be altered or improved. After taking this proof Jill added lines to the plate using metallic paint that may print in second proof as an embossed part of the texture. However as we were working away and Jill pulled this first proof I was excited by how well she had captured an aerial view of Lake Eyre as it dried out. We all got a buzz.

Collagraph is perhaps the most versatile of printmaking surfaces and its hard to know where to start but this technique gives an immediate, tactile way in. A perspex surface is often used for drypoint mark making with implements or by using an electric drill strong enough to gouge or scratch into the hard perspex surface.  In particular this plate on perspex is constructed using plaster of Paris which lends itself to creating geological, organic textures. Looking forward to the next stage.


First Anglesea Art House Printmakers’ Exhibition

The slideshow presentation of the first group exhibition of the printmakers who work, study and experiment with tutor Lee Powell at the Anglesea Art House.

Apologies for some of my photography but the different techniques are clearly visible. In due course I would like to feature the work of the artists separately where we can explore the different ways of printing and how they augment the ideas behind them.

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